Category Archives: high functioning autism

Being a person with both autism and diabetes has its ups and downs.  I do the best I can to sail through the waters smoothly.  I am a good person, a human being just like everyone else, not a hopeless case or a helpless person.  I am driven by motivation and determination to do something amazing, incredible, or tremendous (i.e. a career or learning a new skill)—overcoming the obstacles of my conditions.

Those of you who deal with both conditions, a diagnosis or discovery on either or both conditions is not the end of the world, you can still lead a normal life just like everyone else. Don’t let anyone or anything get in the way of success in whatever you do.  Don’t worry about other people say or think. People who discriminate or say incorrect things are wrong. They’re not in your shoes.

Diabetes may be a life and death disease, but don’t be scared if something happens like a high reading or something else. Don’t panic! Don’t get too stressed out. Zeus can hold onto his lightning bolts. Fear is the worst enemy. Autism causes stress, but that causes hyperglycemia. In a stressful situation, use a positive technique: stop and think. If you have a low reading or if something else is wrong, don’t be afraid to speak up! Take care of your diabetes properly. Do not do anything that will endanger your health. Improper healthcare equals death.

The keys to a successful life are bravery, confidence, and faith.

Be a warrior!

 

Paul Louden

Paul Louden is a radio host with autism who hosts a radio show called “Theories of Mind.”  The show is about how adults go through life with autism.

Find him at KTEK 1110 in Houston, Iradio, or at www.business1110ktek.com.

Bernard Marcus

Bernard Marcus is an American businessman and philanthropist. He co-founded Home Depot and was the company’s first CEO; he served as Chairman of the Board until retiring in 2002.

Marcus has opposed the Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA). He has also suggested that clients send donations to groups and Senate Republicans also against the EFCA. He views the legislation as hindrance to American capitalism, calling it “the demise of a civilization” and suggesting that any retailer who does not fight it “should be shot; should be thrown out of their goddamn jobs.” Marcus has also been an opponent of the Occupy Wall Street movement. In 2015, Marcus donated $1.5 million to Super PACs supporting Jeb Bush and Scott Walker.

Marcus also funded and founded The Marcus Institute, a center of excellence for the provision of comprehensive services for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. In May 2005, Marcus was awarded the Others Award by the Salvation Army its highest honor. Marcus donated $25 million to Autism Speaks to spearhead its efforts to raise money for research on the causes and cure for autism. He is an active member of the board of directors.

Marcus is currently chairman of the Marcus Foundation, whose focuses include children, medical research, free enterprise, Jewish causes and the community. Marcus is on the Board of Directors and an active volunteer for the Shepherd Center. His main focus is in providing care for war veterans with traumatic brain injuries. He was named a Georgia Trustee in 2009. In 2012, Marcus was awarded the William E. Simon Prize for Philanthropic Leader.

Married twice. Two children with his first wife, Fred and Suzanne; and a stepson, Michael, with his second wife, Billi.

10 Things An Autistic Adult Wishes You Knew

  1.  I am autistic, not just adult with autism. It’s part of who I am. Autism is part of who I am. I was born this way. I would not choose to change that. Acknowledging my autism as a part of me is entirely compatible with respecting me as a person with thoughts, feelings, and talents. I am a human being like everyone else and deserve the same dignity and respect that any one else deserves. Please considering whatever term I prefer and do not use language that suggests I suffer from an unfortunate disease.
  2. Autism is a neurological variation, not a disease, or mental illness. Autism often includes differences in social behavior and practical skills. My behaviors and learning styles might vary. My perceptions may differ. I may learn and understand things in way that’s different and process the world in a different way. Please do not judge me or other autistics for our differences.
  3. Who I am and what I am capable of is not defined by medical diagnosing criteria. I am born with my own set of abilities and difficulties, autism included. Those who use it to tell me who I am and what I can do are using it as a stereotype. Please do not make generalizations and assumptions about me or other autistics.
  4. I am not going to be cured. Nothing will change me, and if it could, it would destroy who I am completely and would leave me worse off. I have the right to refuse questionable or risky treatments. My life is my own, I do not want to be cured and I think the idea of curing me and other autistics is wrong. Please respect my individuality and do not try to fix me, because I am not broken.
  5. I may be your adult child, but my life is own. parents do not have the right to choose questionable or risky treatments without my consent. I have my own mind. I can think for myself. I know what I want and don’t want.
  6. Focus on the positives of my, and others autism. I am living my life as best as I can, I want to the make the most of it every day. Talking negatively about autistics and focusing on our weaknesses all the time causes me and other autistics emotional distress. Please do not use language that suggests that being autistic is bad.
  7. I am a logical thinker, that is one of my strengths. It can make me take words, literally, or misunderstand jokes. Also, I may be misunderstood equally by others, if you do not understand my own logical style. I do have my own sense of humor that is unique to me, it’s a stereotype that autistics have no humor.
  8. Socializing is not always easy, if I don’t want to join in, that’s my choice, and I will avoid a situation if I am uncomfortable with it. I am not trying to be rude or impolite. It is simply better for me to participate socially when I choose, rather than feeling forced.
  9. I do have emotions, autistics are not emotionless like some stereotypes suggest. However, I may express them in a different way. What may make someone else cry, can be different for me, it doesn’t mean that I don’t care, or am an uncaring person. My facial expressions might not always reflect my emotions.
  10. If you have an autistic adult in your family, try to find out information about autism. Many articles in the media only concerns children, try and find out the differences in an autistic adult. Some autistics do get married, have jobs, leave home, some don’t, we are all unique. Please do not use language that suggest that being autistic makes a person violent.

There  nearly half a million adults in the UK with undiagnosed autism. The Royal College of GPs has launched a three-year training program to raise awareness and help improve diagnosis rates. Chris Goodchild was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome at the age of 42. He spoke to the BBC about how it affects his life.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30693263

Autism Awareness

For those who know or not, April is autism awareness month. People attend seminar, lectures, or festivals, raise money for awareness, teach the meaning of autism, etc.

 

This is a website about a shop worker who was isolated in a box for 100 hours to raise autism awareness:

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30166571

Discrimination is wrong! People should be very tolerant of people with autusm and treat them with respect and dignity. People with autism are not animals or robots or weird people. They’re human beings, like us. Society should be more accepting.

https://gma.yahoo.com/woman-claims-she-daughter-autism-were-kicked-off-151716493–abc-news-topstories.html